Blog Archives

Postdoctoral Researcher

Postdoctoral Researcher

 

The changing verb phrase in present-day British English.

Applications are invited for the post above which is funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and tenable for three years, starting 1 September 2007.

Applicants must have a PhD in (English) Linguistics, preferably with a specialisation in historical linguistics. A knowledge of statistics and corpus linguistic methodology is an advantage.

The salary (to be confirmed) is GBP26,666 + a London Allowance of GBP2,572 Closing date for applications: Tuesday 3 July 2007 Interviews will take place on Thursday 12 July 2007.

You must normally be permitted to work in the UK.

Please send three copies of your application containing a statement in support of your application, a CV and two full references (not names) to the address below. References may be sent under separate cover by referees.

Emailed or faxed applications are not acceptable, unless there are special circumstances.

We regret that we are not able to acknowledge receipt of applications. We will only contact you in case you are shortlisted.

For further details of the project see:

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/english-usage/projects/verb-phrase/index.htm

A job description appears here:

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/english-usage/projects/verb-phrase/ad.htm

Contact:

Professor Bas Aarts

Department of English Language and Literature University College London Gower Street London WC1E 6BT UK

Email: b.aarts@ucl.ac.uk

Tel: 00 44 20 7679 3130

 

Monthly Lunch Meeting

On 25 May Victorina Gonzalez-Diaz will present her paper "Lose your language and you lose your soul": Prescriptivism in the media (1985-2005) from 12:00-13:00 in 1166 003A. All welcome!

Johnson correspondent Miss Hill Boothby

Paul Ruxin asks if someone has any letters or other examples of the handwriting of Miss Hill Boothby, the 18th century corespondent of Dr. Samuel Johnson. He has recently acquired a first edition of Johnson’s Dictionary, inscribed, "miss Hill Boothby from the author, and wishes to determine whether it is in her handwriting.

Guest Lecture Sylvia Adamson

On 27 April Professor Sylvia Adamson will present her paper "Daughters of earth and sons of heaven: words, things and persons in Johnson’s dictionary". Lipsius building room 147, 12:00-13:00. See poster: Download file

Henry Sweet Society Colloquium

Nicola Mclelland, Honorary Treasurer of the Henry Sweet Society for the History of Linguistic Ideas, has asked us to announce the next colloquium of the Henry Sweet Society, which will take place from 18-22 July, 2007, at the University of Helsinki. For more information as well as the programme of the colloquium, download this document.
Download file

A bibliographic approach to the study of 18th century grammars

María Rodríguez-Gil and Nuria Yáñez-Bouza  are currently carrying out bibliographic research on the eighteenth-century grammatical tradition and they would like to request your collaboration. They have prepared a brief questionnaire, where you will find more information about our study. They would be very grateful if you could take some time to complete it and would return it to them by email (for details, see attached file). Download file

The Infant’s Grammar or a Pic-Nic Party of the Parts of Speech

If you enjoyed the quote from The Infant’s Grammar or a Pic-Nic Party of the Parts of Speech (1822), you can view all the pages from this grammar through this link: http://www.cts.dmu.ac.uk/AnaServer?hockliffe+93567+imageset.anv

Murray comic

View image   This cartoon by Thomas Nast from Harper’s Weekly, 2 August 1884, p. 507, has a double purpose. It lampoons the reputation of Senator John Logan, the Republican vice-presidential nominee, for butchering the English language. It also criticizes the foreign policy of Republican presidential nominee James Blaine, the former secretary of state. "By jingo," is a pun on the candidate’s nickname, "Jingo Jim," a term highlighting his allegedly aggressive, saber-rattling foreign policy. During the 1884 campaign, Blaine often criticized the British government in an attempt to gain the votes of Irish-Americans. By Blaine’s failure to carry out his words in this cartoon, however, Nast indicates that the nominee’s position on the English may be part of his characteristic bluster. In the background, the artist has sketched John Bull, the symbol of Great Britain, in front of London’s Big Ben clock tower. The caption mimics Shakespeare’s Hamlet: "Alas! Poor Yorrick!"

Fokke en Sukke

This year Jean-Marc van Tol has created a new Fokke en Sukke cartoon for The codifiers and the English Language. The cartoon from 2006 can still be viewed here: View image

Bibliographic research on the eighteenth-century grammatical tradition

María Rodríguez-Gil and Nuria Yáñez-Bouza  are currently carrying out bibliographic research on the eighteenth-century grammatical tradition and they would like to request your collaboration. They have prepared a brief questionnaire, where you will find more information about our study. They would be very grateful if you could take some time to complete it and would return it to them by email.  Download file